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Posts tagged copyright

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File-Sharing Boosts Creation of New Hit Music, Research Finds

"The paper provides empirical evidence that file sharing did not reduce the creation of new hit songs. Instead, more new music entered the hit charts, an effect that’s driven by existing artists.

The data shows that the output from existing artists increased, while new artists appeared less frequently in the hit charts. However, since the new material from existing artists was greater than the loss from new artists, the “creation” of new music increased overall.”

Filed under copyright neumusik

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Elsevier is taking down papers from Academia.edu | Sauropod Vertebra Picture of the Week

"Lots of researchers post PDFs of their own papers on their own web-sites. It’s always been so, because even though technically it’s in breach of the copyright transfer agreements that we blithely sign, everyone knows it’s right and proper. Preventing people from making their own work available would be insane, and the publisher that did it would be committing a PR gaffe of huge proportions.

Enter Elsevier, stage left.”

Filed under copyright publishing

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Author Claims That 'Fair Use Is Theft By Any Other Name' | Techdirt

"Copyright law has never been about "protecting against theft." It has always been about an incentive for creation such that the public can benefit. And, along those lines, in the US we’ve long recognized that fair use plays a key role in that, allowing people to increase the amount of creation by being able to build on, transform, comment on, criticize, etc. the works of others. No one is arguing for the wholesale copying of works, or the eradication of copyright here. They’re just saying that the ability to freely quote a small passage for a reasonable purpose shouldn’t require a license — and that makes tremendous sense. In fact, it makes it that much more likely that people will become aware of her works."

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Just As US Finally Realizes Copyright Terms May Be Too Long, Japan Looks To Make Them Longer | Techdirt

"The only way in which retroactive copyright term extension makes sense is if copyright is a welfare system for creators, in which the public is taxed to support the estates of wealthy content creators. And, yes, it is wealthy content creators (or, rather, their children and grandchildren) who are the beneficiaries of such extensions, along with the major multinational corporations who hold most of those copyrights. Studies have shown that the overwhelming majority of beneficiaries of extending copyright are not actual content creators, and certainly not "poor" content creators, but "incumbent holders of major back-catalogues, be they record companies, ageing rock stars or, increasingly, artists’ estates." The "poor artists" who are often cited in support of such extensions are not even in the picture, because the works of poor artists who died 50 years ago are not making much money today. It’s the huge rockstars’ and their works that are still making money today."

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Exorcising the Demon(oid): Ukrainians raid massive BitTorrent tracker | Ars Technica

"The Ukrainian newspaper Kommersant reported (Google Translate) Monday that, according to an anonymous source within the Ukrainian Interior Ministry known only as “B,” the raid was timed with a particular political purpose in mind. First Vice Prime Minister Valeriy Khoroshkovsky recently visited the United States, where he met with United States Trade Representative Ron Kirk to discuss various free-trade issues, including copyright protection."

Filed under copyright

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Why Copyright Is Evil

"Can musicians sit back and collect royalties and a share of the huge monopoly profits of yesteryear? Nope. But, those were the days of the golden handcuffs and the chosen few. The only artists who whine and complain now about those “good old” days are either

Old artists who came up in the old days and are wistful of the time when they only had to record an album every three years to earn 5 times what they earn now, or
Young artists who are too lazy to boot-strap things themselves and wish success was handed to them”

Filed under neumusik copyright

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Techdirt Lite: Exceptionally Troubling Ruling In The UK: Owners Of Links Site Guilty Of 'Conspiracy To Defraud'

"The broadness of the law, and the vague and contradictory standards with which it has been applied in the UK should be exceptionally worrying to people — especially those in the UK. It is no longer safe to try to create a useful service to help people find entertainment content, because you may get raided, private companies may get your computers and you may end up in jail. London has been building itself up as a tech/startup hub of Europe, but with rulings like these, don’t be surprised to see entrepreneurs move elsewhere."

Filed under copyright

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Christian Engström MEP, Rick Falkvinge: The Case for Copyright Reform (2012) at Monoskop/log

"Legalized file sharing, shorter protection times for the commercial copyright monopoly, free sampling and a ban on DRM.

These are the main points of the proposal for copyright reform that the Pirate Party is advocating and which the Greens/EFA group in the European Parliament adopted as its group position in September 2011.
This is a constructive alternative to the controversial ACTA agreement and to the criminalization of the entire generation of youths. This booklet explains why such a reform is both necessary and sustainable and will benefit both citizens and artists.”

Filed under copyright urheberrecht

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Google Lifts The Veil On Copyright Takedowns: Reveals Detailed Data On Who Requests Link Removals | Techdirt

"Perhaps more important, however, is that Google is also revealing the incredible deluge of takedown requests it receives in search, each of which it tries to check to make sure they’re legitimate. As it stands now, Google is processing over 250,000 such requests per week — which is more than they got in the entire year of 2009. For all of 2011, Google receive 3.3 million copyright takedowns for search… and here we are in just May of 2012, and they’re already processing over 1.2 million per month. And while we’ve heard reports from the usual Google haters that Google is slow to respond to takedowns, it says that its average turnaround time last week was 11 hours. Think about that for a second. It’s reviewing each one of these takedowns, getting 250,000 per week… and can still process them in less than 12 hours. That’s pretty impressive."

Filed under google copyright